THE ABSURD TIMES — STILL

INNOCENT VICTIMS OF WAR — YEMEN TOO

Posted in Uncategorized by @honestcharlie on May 30, 2017

ABSURD TIMES

A chart of Wahabbi exports from Saudi Arabia, a place where Trump feels much at home and the area where his daughter owns clearly marked buildings. So many you may need to enlarge.

This talks about the Manchester bombings, but it is true for every such incident in the past 3 decades, at least.

While there is absolutely no guilt associated with any of the victims of the bombing in Manchester, all complete innocents, not one seemed to know there was such as thing as “Colonialism,” or whatever, each and every one of them was profiled, discussed, lamented, and, frankly, exploited by our western media. Sympathy pours out, and rightly so, for all of them.

All we know about others are some facts about the perpetrators. The father, arrested as a result in Syria, was an Al-Quaeda supporter along with his children. He was one of those who kept opposing Gaddafi in Libya. At the time, we labeled such people as innocent civilians and used the defense of such people as a pretext for a UN Resolution to attack Libya. The result is well-know, along with the immigration problem Europe faces, radical terror, etc.

We do not hear about the civilians we bomb or kill in Syria, Afghanistan and Yemen. Wedding parties are a prime example. How many names have you heard from bombings of wedding parties in Yemen recently? Nothing. “Collateral Damage,” is about the best they come up with.

A recent attack in Syria killed “people who knew Isis fighters.” Well, let’s think about that fact. Growing up in Chicago, say during Elementary School or Middle School, I often visited the homes of table-tennis partners. Often, the parents were Greek or Italian immigrants who owned Pizza parlors or small restaurants. Several of us were well treated to massive dinners, great hospitality, friendship, and so on. Sometimes the sessions, including looking a photographs, listening to records, etc., would go on until midnight, 12:00 precisely, when a group of guys wearing suits and ties, looking very grim and determined, even evil, came in and the father would say “Get outta here, hurry, no more, tomorrow maybe.” And that was it for the evening. In a sense, you could say I “knew” Mafia or whatever members, but I swear that I was not involved in their activities. There would be no excuse to bomb me, however. I was a “civilian”.

Anyway, we simply do not humanize any of those innocent civilians we kill, whether or not they would invite us to dinner or want to have anything to do with us. That’s the point. We see this going on in Yemen, for example. We wonder why someone would join such a batty organization as ISIS, but we have to consider what the recruiting mechanisms are. Imagine one of your own family, or perhaps a friend, killed during a wedding ceremony. You know it has happened before. You also are not well-off, many of your friends are starving. You know where the bombs were made, who sent them, and so on. Is it inconceivable that you would like to retaliate? Perhaps a nut-job group like ISIS presents you with opportunity to get even. Would you resist or object because their theological positions are out of tune with yours? These are simply things to consider.

Now here is an interview that clarifies some of that. I’ve managed to reformat the text so that it is more readable:

“In Britain, police are expanding their investigation into Monday’s suicide bombing in Manchester that killed 22 and left dozens injured. Many of those killed were young girls. While the Manchester story has dominated international headlines, far less attention has been paid to other stories this week involving the deaths of civilians. In Syria and Iraq, U.S.-led or backed airstrikes have killed dozens of civilians in the last week alone. Meanwhile, in Yemen, the human rights group Reprieve says U.S. Navy SEALs killed five civilians during a raid Tuesday night on a village in Ma’rib governorate. To talk more about how the media covers civilian casualties, we speak with two of the founders of The Intercept: Jeremy Scahill and Glenn Greenwald.

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